Turmeric also known as Yellow Ginger

There is already so much information on the web about this. It is really exciting to me to see how many people are getting away from processed foods and back to basic’s. I do believe that our world is changing for the positive.

Turmeric: Turmeric’s essential oils contain a wealth of antibiotic molecules, making this antibacterial food useful for treating topical cuts and wounds. Turmeric is also often taken in Ayurvedic medicine to prevent and treat colds and other internal infections. Cooking can destroy the fragile antibacterial molecules in turmeric, so to retain its health benefits, try these recipes.

Read more: http://www.naturalhomeandgarden.com/blogs/blog.aspx?blogid=2147483735&tag=turmeric#ixzz1xnN1Lpi9

India is the worlds largest producer of turmeric powder as well as the world’s largest consumer of the powder.

The city of Erode in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu is the world’s largest producer of turmeric. Erode has often been referred to as “Yellow City” or “Turmeric City.”

It is a ritual in Indian weddings to apply turmeric paste over the bride and groom’s face and arms.

Women in India sometimes use turmeric paste to remove excess body hair.

Dr. Eric Lattman of Aston University has identified turmeric as a natural antivenin for King Cobra snake bites.

People in the Middle Ages called turmeric “Indian saffron” because it was often used as a less expensive alternative to saffron.

Here is a link to a great website:

Turmeric: Turmeric’s essential oils contain a wealth of antibiotic molecules, making this antibacterial food useful for treating topical cuts and wounds. Turmeric is also often taken in Ayurvedic medicine to prevent and treat colds and other internal infections. Cooking can destroy the fragile antibacterial molecules in turmeric, so to retain its health benefits, try these recipes.

Read more: http://www.naturalhomeandgarden.com/blogs/blog.aspx?blogid=2147483735&tag=turmeric#ixzz1xnN1Lpi9

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13 thoughts on “Turmeric also known as Yellow Ginger

  1. wordpressreport says:

    Reblogged this on WordPress Report.

  2. sybaritica says:

    I *cannot* do without turmeric!!

  3. Awesome, I look forward to it. Post the link to the post.

  4. After salt and pepper, knowing of its benefits, turmeric is the most used spice in Persian cooking.
    In Persian cuisine, saffron of course, is the most decadent one, but too expensive to use for day-to-day cooking. My mother used it for almost all her dishes. I have used it in my ‘kotlet’ recipe. I really do love your blog!

  5. I LOVE Persian food. Yall make the best rice on the planet. Darn good chicken too.

  6. […] potato (12oz/340gm) 1 large carrot (12oz/340gm) 1 large onion (12oz/340gm) very finely chopped 1 tsp turmeric 1/2 tsp salt 1/4 tsp pepper 3 Tbsp finely chopped parsley (optional) 2 eggs vegetable oil 1 cup […]

  7. Melanie Schultes says:

    Ayurvedic medicine is also very effective specially if the practioner is very well rehearsed on the type of herbs that needs to be used on your body. ‘`.*’ Warm regards medicine dosage site

  8. Laverne Quilliam says:

    Ayurvedic medicine is also great complement for traditional medicine. Both works in my case. ^

    Check out all of the most up to date write-up on our own webpage
    http://www.foodsupplementdigest.com/vitamin-b6-benefits/

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