Got Gothic

Jasmine Becket Griffith

Strangling

The art of

Jasmine Becket-Griffith

Hey everyone. In America we had “President’s Day” yesterday, a National Holiday celebrating Washington, and Lincoln’s birthdays. Anyways fortunately I got the day off school, so I could do all the homework due on my British Literature 8 week online course on the Romantic Era, primarily, Mary Wollstonecraft (Preeminent Feminist), Jane Austen, and Mary’s daughter, Mary Shelley. Doesn’t everyone love Frankenstein, one of the best novels of that genre, and period.

I love the story behind the story. In a later edition Mary Shelley, at her publishers request answers the question, “How I, then a young girl, came to think of, and to dilate upon, so very hideous an idea?”

I will share a few excerpts, but if your interested read the entire story at the link.

~~~

In the summer of 1816, we visited Switzerland, and became the neighbours of Lord Byron. At first we spent our pleasant hours on the lake, or wandering on its shores; and Lord Byron, who was writing the third canto of Childe Harold, was the only one among us who put his thoughts upon paper. These, as he brought them successively to us, clothed in all the light and harmony of poetry, seemed to stamp as divine the glories of heaven and earth, whose influences we partook with him.

. . . But it proved a wet, ungenial summer, and incessant rain often confined us for days to the house.Some volumes of ghost stories, translated from the German into French, fell into our hands. There was the History of the Inconstant Lover, who, when he thought to clasp the bride to whom he had pledged his vows, found himself in the arms of the pale ghost of her whom he had deserted. . . 

“We will each write a ghost story,” said Lord Byron; and his proposition was acceded to. There were four of us. The noble author began a tale, a fragment of which he printed at the end of his poem of Mazeppa. Shelley, more apt to embody ideas and sentiments in the radiance of brilliant imagery, commenced one founded on the experiences of his early life. . . 

I busied myself to think of a story, —a story to rival those which had excited us to this task. One which would speak to the mysterious fears of our nature, and awaken thrilling horror—one to make the reader dread to look round, to curdle the blood, and quicken the beatings of the heart. If I did not accomplish these things, my ghost story would be unworthy of its name. I thought and pondered—vainly. I felt that blank incapability of invention which is the greatest misery of authorship, when dull Nothing replies to our anxious invocations. Have you thought of a story? I was asked each morning, and each morning I was forced to reply with a mortifying negative. . .

Many and long were the conversations between Lord Byron and Shelley, to which I was a devout but nearly silent listener. During one of these, various philosophical doctrines were discussed, and among others the nature of the principle of life, and whether there was any probability of its ever being discovered and communicated. They talked of the experiments of Dr. Darwin. . .

Night waned upon this talk, and even the witching hour had gone by, before we retired to rest. When I placed my head on my pillow, I did not sleep, nor could I be said to think. My imagination, unbidden, possessed and guided me, gifting the successive images that arose in my mind with a vividness far beyond the usual bounds of reverie. I saw—with shut eyes, but acute mental vision, —I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together. I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half vital motion. Frightful must it be; for supremely frightful would be the effect of any human endeavour to mock the stupendous mechanism of the Creator of the world. His success would terrify the artist; he would rush away from his odious handywork, horror-stricken. . .

I opened mine in terror. The idea so possessed my mind, that a thrill of fear ran through me, and I wished to exchange the ghastly image of my fancy for the realities around. I see them still; the very room, the dark parquet, the closed shutters, with the moonlight struggling through, and the sense I had that the glassy lake and white high Alps were beyond. I could not so easily get rid of my hideous phantom; still it haunted me. I must try to think of something else. I recurred to my ghost story, my tiresome unlucky ghost story! O! if I could only contrive one which would frighten my reader as I myself had been frightened that night!

~~~~

This piece of writing about the backstory, and Frankenstein’s conception is brilliant. I was talking with my good friend, owner of a renowned cat, hint; Not Grumpy Cat, about a movie made of this, Haunted Summer (1988). I haven’t seen it in 20 years but I recall liking it.

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5 thoughts on “Got Gothic

  1. Dewin Nefol says:

    Hey Sindy,

    A fascinating preamble inspiring further investigation of a book that I have never read cover-to-cover but encountered several times through the medium of film. Shelly’s back-story is curiously thought-provoking as to the ideals, motifs and symbols contained within the story itself…the merry dance and interplay of Victorian values and the extremism of Romantic Era fiction are certainly interesting topics for consideration as literary devices. One wonders at the interplay of Fire and Light as central themes and how they imbed themselves so poignantly within the characterisation of leading protagonists.

    I enjoyed the accompanying artwork and found the symbolism entertaining. Thank you for its inclusion.

    I trust the studies are going well and success in your academic pursuits prevails as always. Best of luck in all ways.

    Take care 🙂

    Namaste

    DN – 18/02/2016

    • Your alive! Thank the gods, As a filmmaker I would really like to make that into a film, they did so but I could do it better or pick a filmmaker that could. Her mother’s story is an interesting one as well, she was hanging out in the Paris salons during the French Revolution. So far, so good, last stint before ASU. Please don’t go missing for so long. 😀

      Sindy

      Lets chat eh?

  2. Sounds like you are still as busy as a bee, lovely you got a day off.. Have a good week Sindy .. take care love Sue xxx

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