The Wake Up Code

cosmic climb

This is my derived hypothesis on the 11, 111,1111 . . . or any such reoccurring number phenomena.

However, it mainly comes from Brannon Braga, a Star Trek writer. I was discussing it on Facebook, and reading the scenario on Wikipedia, which I will share, I have always been a Trekkie, and found deep metaphysical relevance in the Star Trek of Roddenberry.

Star Trek, The Next Generation

Cause and Effect

Netflix- Season 5, Episode 18

Wiki

“Cause and Effect” is the 18th episode of the fifth season of the American science fiction television series Star Trek: The Next Generation, the 118th overall. It was originally released on March 23, 1992, in broadcast syndication. It was written by Brannon Braga, who sought to write a different type of time travel related plot, and directed by cast member Jonathan Frakes.

Plot

The viewer is shown through the episode that Enterprise is caught in a time loop (referred to in-universe as a “temporal causality loop”). The loop begins with the senior members of the crew playing poker and continues for about a day when they discover a spatial anomaly. While studying the anomaly, a ship suddenly emerges from it, and though Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) takes Lt. Commander Data’s (Brent Spiner) advice over Commander William T. Riker’s (Jonathan Frakes) for avoiding a collision, the new ship clips the warp nacelle, causing a critical failure and the destruction of the Enterprise moments later, at which point the loop restarts.

Initially, the crew are unaware of the loop. However, Dr. Beverly Crusher (Gates McFadden) begins to hear noises before she goes to bed following the poker game. Having a sense of déjà vu during the poker game and able to predict the cards Data will deal during a subsequent loop, Crusher takes a tricorder with her to her room, records the voices, and later analyzes them to discover they are the panicked commands and broadcasts of the crew. The senior staff work out that they are stuck in the loop; the voices they are hearing are those of themselves from the previous loop just prior to the destruction of the ship. They evaluate the voices to determine that the loop is restarted due to the collision of the two ships but do not know how to avoid that collision in the first place. Data suggests that his positronic brain can be used to send a short message to himself in the next loop which may help them to avoid the collision. When they arrive at the anomaly, and after the collision, Data sends the message.

On the following loop, Crusher again has a feeling of déjà vu during the poker game, but when Data deals the next hand, all the cards are threes, followed by a hand where all players have three of a kind. The number 3 begins appearing throughout other parts of the ship’s operations while, again, they determine they are stuck in a time loop. When they reach the anomaly and the ship appears from it, Data suddenly realizes that the 3 stands for the number of command pips on Riker’s uniform, and executes Riker’s option instead of his own. This allows Enterprise to safely clear the oncoming ship. The anomaly disappears and the time loop ends, and the crew realize they have been trapped in the loop for over 17 days, while the other ship, the USS Bozeman, has been missing for over 90 years. Picard welcomes the Bozeman’s crew to the 24th century.

~~~

The Harmonic Convergence , August 16–17, 1987 was a big event in my life. I was 29, first Saturn Return. I was in Los Angeles. I believe it was at the Pasadena Convention Center, it was like a Whole Life Expo event with all the New Age vendors. I was fairly new to Metaphysics, about 3 years, so I was full of wonder, and awe. I bought the Urantia Book, first saw moldavite, saw Marianne Williamson, Elizabeth Claire Prophet, and sorts of other New Age guru’s. It was early on my path, and a monumental day. I bring it up because for me the phenomena began between then, and 1992 when the Star Trek episode aired. (On Netflix)

The phenomena become more evident as we all began connecting via the worldwide web. Around 1992, people began to connect and share. Spiritual, New Age, and Metaphysical Forums were created. At this time we shared this phenomena and were able to discern by the number of occurring events of seeing this number, as well as other master number combinations, that there must be some reason. There must be. As the years rolled on it did not cease it intensified, and this episode of Star Trek, just always seemed like it hit closest to the money. Perhaps the Wheel of Samsara, is akin to a “temporal causality loop,”  or the symbol, Ouroboros, similarly represents the concept. All these triggers to REMEMBER, and to WAKE UP!  All of US, a Mass Awakening, BIG.

It’s the most plausible answer for me anyway, and I wanted to share it with you.

Namaste

VOTE, and when you VOTE American’s, set a POSITIVE, and glorious INTENTION, for our nation. I know some of you in the East have already voted but hold a good vision. Non American’s, please pray for us, and hold a good intention.

Love to All

Sindy

Los Dias de Los Muertos

hello-kitty-day-of-the-dead-pristine-cartera-turkus

10-dia-de-los-muertos-pristine-cartera-turkus

Dead Can Dance

😀 Happy Day of the Dead 😀

Day of the Dead

The Day of the Dead is a unique festival that is the result of 16th century contact between Mesoamerica and Europe. Conceptually, it is a hybrid, owing its origins to both prehispanic Aztec philosophy and religion and medieval European ritual practice. Ceremonies held during the Aztec summer month of Miccailhuitontli were mainly focused on the celebration of the dead. These were held under the supernatural direction of the goddess Mictecacihuatl. (1) Both children and dead ancestors were remembered and celebrated. It was also during this month that the Aztecs commemorated fallen warriors. According to Diego Duran, a 16th century Spanish priest, the Aztecs would bring offerings of food to altars in honor of the dead. They would also place small clay images that were supposed to represent the deceased on these same altars. (2)

When the Spaniards arrived in the 16th century, they brought the Christian Holiday of All Soul’s Day with them. This was a Roman Catholic holy day commemorating the dead in general as well as baptized Christians who were believed to be in purgatory. Spanish priests were quick to see a correlation between the Aztec and Christian celebrations so moved the Aztec festival from summer to fall so that it coincided with All Soulsâ day. This was done in the hopes that the Aztec holiday, which the Spaniards considered to be pagan, would be transformed into an acceptable Christian holiday.

The result of this cultural blending is an event where modern Mexicanos celebrate their ancestors during the first two days of November, rather than at the beginning of summer. While this modern festival has Christian components, it still maintains its indigenous Native American ones.

Across Mexico, activities associated with Day of the Dead are fairly consistent from place to place. On the first day, families visit the graves of their relatives. During this time, they decorate the gravesite with flowers, earth, and candles. The also hold a kind of picnic at the graveside where they interact socially among themselves and with other families and community members who are all gathered at the cemetery. The stories that are exchanged by the families often feature other people who are also buried in the same cemetery. In this way, Day of the Dead acts as a method of social cohesion between different groups of people. Folks gathered around the graves are there not only to celebrate their ancestors, but to celebrate the role that those ancestors played in a larger community.

The meals prepared for these picnics include tamales and pan de muerto (a special bread in the shape of a person). Many people believe that it is good luck to be the one who bites into the plastic toy skeleton hidden by the baker in each rounded loaf. Sweets are also included in the feast. These include, cookies, chocolate and sugar skulls. Friends and family members exchange gifts consisting of sugar skeletons or other items with a death related iconography. Often times, a gift is more prized if the skull or skeleton has one’s own name written on it with icing. As in the case of pan de muerto, when the celebrant takes a bite out of the skull, the person symbolically “takes a bite of death” and thereby, inoculates themselves against the fear of death.

Decoration is not restricted to gravesites. Often times people set up home altars dedicated to the same relatives. These are profusely decorated with flowers (primarily yellow and orange marigolds and/or crysanthemums). These were called cempoa-xochitl and are a clear holdover from Pre-Columbian times. For the Aztecs, the color yellow referenced the autumn—a season when nature begins to die. The arc or arco that forms a semi-halo atop the altar is symbolic of the path taken across the heavens by the dead. As in the case of the gravesides, home altars are also adorned with religious amulets and food offerings. The foods chosen are generally those that the deceased enjoyed during his life. This can run the gamut to different kinds of fruit, to cigarettes, and alcoholic beverages. Mescal is a favorite. All in all, the altar represents a recognition of the cycle of life and death that is part of human existence. There is some slight variation in how Day of the Dead is observed in Mexico. For instance, its celebration in large cities, like Oaxaca, leans more toward the secular than the sacred. Also, foodstuffs and altar construction are, logically enough, dependant upon the natural resources of the area. Nonetheless, what seems to be maintained throughout is the remembrance of the dead and the celebration of the continuity of life and the community.

(1) This deity’s name means “Lady of the Dead.” She was the female counterpart of Mictlantecuhtli, the lord of the underworld.
(2) See, Diego Duran, Book of the Gods and Rites and The Ancient Calendar. Translated and edited by Fernando Horcasitas and Doris Heyden. Norman, University of Oklahoma Press [1971].

Article with cool hyperlinks

I have been to the  San Francisco’s Day of the Dead with my baby sister.

Art

Pristine Cartera-Turkus