Pumpkin Bread

Ingredients

3-1/3 cups flour

2 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp baking powder

1-1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground nutmeg

1/2 tsp ground cloves

2/3 cup cool to cold butter, cut into small cubes

1 (16 oz) can pureed pumpkin (NOT pumpkin pie filling)

4 eggs, slightly beaten

2-2/3 cup sugar

2/3 cup milk

1 cup golden raisins (much softer than regular raisins), optional

1 cup chopped pecans or other nuts, optional

Glaze, optional

 

Glaze Ingredients

3 oz softened cream cheese, at room temperature

2 tbsp softened butter

2 tbsp milk, or as needed

1/3 to 1/2 cup powdered sugar, depending on how sweet you like your glaze

1/2 tsp freshly squeezed lemon juice

 Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Beat with an electric mixer until very smooth. add more milk if needed to get fairly thin drizzling consistency.

Pour over cooled bread or cake. Pass additional glaze at the table.

 Jane Evans Bonacci – The Heritage Cook

Pumpkins Health Benefits

  • It is one of the very low calorie vegetables. 100 g fruit provides just 26 calories and contains no saturated fats or cholesterol; however, it is rich in dietary fiber, anti-oxidants, minerals, vitamins. The vegetable is one of the food items recommended by dieticians in cholesterol controlling and weight reduction programs.
  • Pumpkin is a storehouse of many anti-oxidant vitamins such as vitamin-A, vitamin-C and vitamin-E.
  • With 7384 mg per 100 g, it is one of the vegetables in the Cucurbitaceae family featuring highest levels of vitamin-A, providing about 246% of RDA. Vitamin A is a powerful natural anti-oxidant and is required by the body for maintaining the integrity of skin and mucus membranes. It is also an essential vitamin for good visual sight. Research studies suggest that natural foods rich in vitamin A help a body protects against lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • It is also an excellent source of many natural poly-phenolic flavonoid compounds such as α, ß carotenes, cryptoxanthin, lutein and zea-xanthin. Carotenes convert into vitamin A inside the body.
  • Zea-xanthin is a natural anti-oxidant which has UV (ultra-violet) rays filtering actions in the macula lutea in retina of the eyes. Thus, it helps protect from “age-related macular disease” (ARMD) in the elderly.
  • The fruit is a good source of B-complex group of vitamins like folates, niacin, vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), thiamin and pantothenic acid.
  • It is also rich source of minerals like copper, calcium, potassium and phosphorus.
  • Pumpkin seeds indeed are an excellent source of dietary fiber and mono-unsaturated fatty acids, which are good for heart health. In addition, the seeds are concentrated sources of protein, minerals and health-benefiting vitamins. For instance, 100 g of pumpkin seeds provide 559 calories, 30 g of protein, 110% RDA of iron, 4987 mg of niacin (31% RDA), selenium (17% of RDA), zinc (71%) etc., but no cholesterol. Further, the seeds are an excellent source of health promoting amino acidtryptophan. Tryptophan is converted to GABA in the brain.

Source

Blueberry Alien Pie

I made that up.

Blueberry Cream Cheese Pie

One 9″ Graham cracker crust

1 8 oz. PHILADELPHIA Cream Cheese bar

1 can condensed milk

1/3 cup lemon juice

1 tsp. vanilla

Mix the cream cheese with the condensed milk with a mixer. Then add the lemon juice and vanilla. Mix well to thicken. Pour into crust.

Blueberry Topping

1 1/2 cups fresh or frozen blueberries

1/4 cup sugar

Heaping tsp. corn starch

Cook berries with sugar over medium/low heat, stirring well. Add a heaping tsp. corn starch to thicken. Mix well and cook about 5 min.

Pour over top of cream cheese mixture and chill for a few hours.

http://southernhospitalityblog.com/blueberry-cream-cheese-pie/

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This is not my recipe but close. We added layers of sliced bananas and it was called Million Dollar Pie.

This is the closest recipe, I saw a few on the internet that included crushed pineapple….so you choose.

 

My Tee Shirt Store

Homemade Granola

I am a bit like granola, nutty, crunchy, and sweet. I don’t have raisins though. I love, love, love good granola. I am not, nor have I ever been a cereal eater, but granola…yum. You can tell that I am from California. I found this recipe on the net. I want some.

Ingredients

  • 3 cups rolled oats
  • 1 cup slivered almonds
  • 1 cup cashews
  • 3/4 cup shredded sweet coconut
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup raisins

Directions

Preheat oven to 250 degrees F.

In a large bowl, combine the oats, nuts, coconut, and brown sugar.

In a separate bowl, combine maple syrup, oil, and salt. Combine both mixtures and pour onto 2 sheet pans. Cook for 1 hour and 15 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes to achieve an even color.

Remove from oven and transfer into a large bowl. Add raisins and mix until evenly distributed.

Recipe courtesy Alton Brown

Water Chestnuts

About Water Chestnuts:

Water chestnuts – where would Chinese food be without them? The knobby vegetable with the papery brown skin is a staple in Chinese cooking. The water chestnut is actually not a nut at all, but an aquatic vegetable that grows in marshes. (This is why the ones that you purchase in the store may have a muddy coating.) The name “water chestnut” comes from the fact that it resembles a chestnut in shape and coloring. Indigenous to Southeast Asia, it has been cultivated in China since ancient times.

Nutritional Information:

Nutritionally, water chestnuts are a good source of potassium and fiber. They are low in sodium, and fat is virtually non-existent. Caloriewise, one cup of water chestnut slices contains about one hundred-thirty calories. Low carb dieters, beware: water chestnuts are high in carbohydrates. You may try replacing them with low carb bamboo shoots.
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