Day Dreamer Award

Thank you,wannabearchietect

Thank you so much to http://wannabearchitect.wordpress.com/ for nominating me.  I do not know the name of this lovely young woman, here at wordpress she is known as wannabearchitect, a word I always have a hard time spelling. We have only recently met yet; this creative and talented young woman has chosen to nominate me for the Day Dreamer Award. In elementary school the teachers gave me high marks in day dreaming, so now I have achieved their expectations. (Cat that ate the canary grin) Thank you again, I am flattered and honored by the sweet things you said, and the nomination.

RULES:

1)      Upon receipt of this award, you are to take mental vacation for five minutes. (Gaze off into space, look out of  the window, have yourself a wonderful day dream..)

2)      When you have returned from your day dream, you are required to take another one tomorrow.

3)      Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

4)      Award this to three (3) people. You can only pass on this award to three (3) people only.

Nominations:

1)      http://hellisafourletterword.wordpress.com/

2)      http://clotildajamcracker.wordpress.com/

3)      http://bluegrassnotes.wordpress.com/

Metamorphosis

Butterflies and moths go through a life cycle known as complete metamorphosis. The stages of their life cycle include: egg, larva, pupa, and adult.

 

The Butterfly by Earl Nightengale

There’s a story attributed to Henry Miller, the writer, about a little boy in India who went up to a guru who was sitting and looking at something in his hand. The little boy went up and looked at it. He didn’t quite understand what it was, so he asked the guru, “What is that?”

“It’s a cocoon,” answered the guru, “Inside the cocoon is a butterfly. Soon the cocoon is going to split, and the butterfly will come out.”

“Could I have it?” asked the little boy.

“Yes,” said the guru, “but you must promise me that when the cocoon splits and the butterfly starts to come out and is beating it’s wings to get out of the cocoon, you won’t help it. It is important not to help the butterfly by breaking the cocoon apart. It must do it on its own.”

The little boy promised, took the cocoon, and went home with it. He then sat and watched it. He saw it begin to vibrate and move and quiver, and finally the cocoon split in half. Inside was a beautiful damp butterfly, frantically beating its wings against the cocoon, trying to get out and not seeming to be able to do it. The little boy desperately wanted to help. Finally, he gave in, and pushed the two halves of the cocoon apart. The butterfly sprang out, but as soon as it got out, it fell to the ground and was dead. The little boy picked up the dead butterfly and in tears went back to the guru and showed it to him.

“Little boy,” said the guru, “You pushed open the cocoon, didn’t you?”

“Yes,” said the little boy, “I did.”

The guru spoke to him gravely, “You don’t understand. You didn’t understand what you were doing. When the butterfly comes out of the cocoon, the only way he can strengthen its wings is by beating them against the cocoon. It beats against the cocoon so its muscles will grow strong. When you helped it, you prevented it from developing the muscles it would need to survive.”